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Of Note This Week — Personal Finance Edition

by anna on September 19, 2009

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Unlike Greenpeace, I am a great friend to the dolphin. They even let me hitch rides on occasion.

Unlike Greenpeace, I am a great friend to the dolphin. They even let me hitch rides on occasion.

Here are some of my favorite articles from this week in the world of personal finance. Enjoy at your leisure, and don’t forget to check out the ABDPBT, ABDPBT Tech, and ABDPBT Commodity Fetishism versions as well. If you have a link to suggest for next week, please email me at anna at abdpbt View definition in a new window dot com and I’ll check it out.

  • Score another tick for the Purple Movement: Greenpeace’s involvement in the dolphin-safe tuna movement has created an ecological disaster by encouraging a “dolphin-safe” method of catching tuna that actually ends up killing more dolphins than the original version did. Way to look at the big picture, once again, you commie pinkos. Unlike Greenpeace, I love dolphins — I’ve even provided pictorial proof of this in the header. Dolphins are going purple this season, just you watch.
  • Here’s another successful online entrepreneur’s story about how making money in Web 2.0 requires you to first give things away for free. Interesting and inspiring to look at commerce in this way.
  • Oh, and this story is rich — protesters going to Washington, D.C. to complain about the “socialism” that they think Obama is pushing upon them are up in arms about the lack of public transit options made easily accessible to them. Apparently, they want a big government to support their ruggedly individualistic self-reliance. Wait. What?

Of Note This Week — Personal Finance Edition

by anna on September 12, 2009

Toilet paper roll art by Junior Fritz Jacquet.

Toilet paper roll art by Junior Fritz Jacquet.

  • This artist, Junior Fritz Jacquet, must be a frugal blog reader, because he’s become a master at creating art out of toilet paper rolls. You can see more of his green and frugal-friendly artwork here.
  • My buddy, Frank Curmudgeon at Bad Money Advice, presents a well-argued and historically contextualized argument for why stocks should not continue to be overemphasized as a wealth-building tool. Before putting all our faith in stocks, Frank says, we should remember that the growth of the past fifty years had much to do with a change in how institutions used money as it did with actual market growth, and we cannot count on that happening to the same degree again.
  • The Weakonomist offers us a simple explanation of the differences between Private Equities, Venture Capitalists, and Angel Investors. That wasn’t so hard, was it? Wait, where do “financiers” fit into this equation? Now I’m confused again. Please help — I’m cold and frightened.
  • And finally, a smart and chilling rant from Slacktivist about check cashing fees and the invisible class barriers of bank accounts.

Of Note This Week — Personal Finance Edition

by anna on September 5, 2009

Photo by Dominic Episcopo Photography

Photo by Dominic Episcopo Photography

Here are some of my favorite articles from this week in the world of personal finance. Enjoy at your leisure, and don’t forget to check out the ABDPBT, ABDPBT Tech, and ABDPBT Commodity Fetishism versions as well. If you have a link to suggest for next week, please email me at anna at abdpbt View definition in a new window dot com and I’ll check it out.

  • Here’s a list of homemade holiday gifts that people might actually want. From Wise Bread.
  • Those hideous ads for flatter stomachs with the cellulite-covered belly? Yeah, that’s why I don’t use Ad Sense on this site anymore–whatever I was getting from Google in exchange for running them (pennies) was being far outweighed by the damage they were doing to my readers’ experience on my site. Based on this article from Slate, I don’t think I was alone in my annoyance with the ads. The article explains why the recession is to blame for the proliferation of these ads everywhere on the internet in recent months.
  • I know everybody already knows this, but Seth Godin is just so, so smart. His article this week about organizing customers into buying cartels is the kind of innovative thinking that is shaping the post-recession economy. If you want to know what is going to happen with internet, marketing, blogs, and all new media, he’s the one to watch.

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